Rachel Straus - Dance Writer

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Juilliard Dance

 
Published: October 24, 2017
Category: review

Ratmansky's Latest for ABT Pays Tribute to Home

By Rachel Straus In Alexei Ratmansky’s Songs of Bukovina, seen in its premiere October 21 by the American Ballet Theater, the Russian choreographer creates an unsettled world, where freedom’s ecstasy is tendered but never fully awakened in the movements of ten dancers. This quality of being tantalizingly reigned-in is purposeful. It speaks to the place []

Published: May 31, 2016
Category: review

ABT's Symposium Raises Ratmansky's Bar Even Higher

By Rachel Straus NEW YORK—The American Ballet Theatre, now at the Metropolitan Opera House to July 2, is devoting entire evenings to the choreography of Alexei Ratmansky, its artist-in-residence since 2009 and arguably the most revered ballet maker of the decade. With the premiere of his Serenade after Plato’s Symposium, set to and named after []

Published: April 21, 2016
Category: review

Miami City Ballet Gets it Right. Mostly

By Rachel Straus NEW YORK–Miami City Ballet’s gala opening night (April 13), presented by the Joyce Theater at the former New York State Theater, offered what gala opening nights should offer: A taste of a company’s new and old repertoire, a best-foot-forward presentation of its stars and corps, and programming that leaves one hungry for []

Published: February 12, 2015
Category: review

Justin Peck's 'Rōdē,ō: What Would Agnes Say?

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — It was as if the feisty spirit of Agnes De Mille had cast a wicked spell. De Mille, whose ballet first brought Copland’s Rodeo to life in 1942, would not have looked kindly on Justin Peck’s decision to make an abstract dance on that classic score. And so when the []

Published: December 3, 2014
Category: profile

Misy Copeland: Profile in Courage

By Rachel Straus

Thanks to Misty Copeland, gone are the days when a company dancer keeps her thoughts to herself and waits for the person in charge (usually a man) to give her the spotlight. The first Black, American Ballet Theatre soloist in more than two decades, Copeland has been increasingly vocal about two things: the []

Published: February 12, 2013
Category: review

At City Ballet, ‘New’ Is Hardly New

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — New York City Ballet has become the house of retrospection. Not only because of the Balanchine legacy, but also because some of its newest works are suffused with images of the past, delivering culturally conservative messages. Take Justin Peck’s third City Ballet work, Paz de la Jolla, which premiered Jan. []

Published: February 8, 2012
Category: review

Ballet's Global Currency

By Rachel Straus Like the 18th-century itinerant ballet masters who entertained and often taught aristocrats, choreographers Christopher Wheeldon, Alexei Ratmansky and Wayne McGregor crisscross the globe, creating dances for the world’s elite ballet companies and their audiences. On Jan. 28, New York City Ballet devoted an entire evening at the former New York State Theater []

Published: November 21, 2011
Category: review

ABT in a Modern-dance Mood

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — American Ballet Theater looked on Nov. 9 like a ballet company camouflaged as a modern dance troupe. This wasn’t a bad thing. In the New York City Center program, featuring three out of four works by modern dance-makers, ABT members shed much of their classicism. They soft-shoed in Paul []

Published: November 14, 2011
Category: review

Nina Ananiashvili, One-woman Show

By Rachel Straus NEW YORK — Like her legendary predecessor Anna Pavlova, Nina Ananiashvili is that rare ballet dancer whose powers don’t weaken with age. Pavlova toured the world performing “Dying Swan” into her forties; Ananiashvili, now 46, graced the Avery Fisher Hall stage on Nov. 5 as the Swan, one of four works danced []

Published: July 20, 2011
Category: review

When the Star Is the Set: Ratmansky's "Anna Karenina"

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — There was a surprise star of the Mariinsky Ballet’s “Anna Karenina,” which had its U.S. premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House July 11-14, and she wasn’t a member of the famed company from St. Petersburg. Based on a novel by the great Russian realist writer Leo Tolstoy, choreographed by the []