Rachel Straus - Dance Writer

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Juilliard Dance

 
Published: April 18, 2013
Category: review

Nederlands Dans Theater, sans Kylián

By Rachel Straus

Nederlands Dans Theater’s brief visit (April 12-13) to the former New York State Theater was greeted with sold-out audiences and standing ovations. This was to be expected; the company hasn’t been seen in New York since 2004, and it has been much admired for its folk-inflected, ballet-meets-modern, kinetically charged romantic works by []

Published: August 3, 2012
Category: history

Royal Winnipeg Ballet at Jacob's Pillow

By Rachel Straus

Like the history of Jacob’s Pillow, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s evolution reads like a pioneer’s tale. Becket, Massachusetts and Winnipeg, Canada are not obvious places to build internationally hailed dance institutions. Yet in 1939, Gweneth Lloyd and her former pupil Betty Farrally formed the Winnipeg Ballet Club. A few years earlier, Ted []

Published: April 19, 2012
Category: review

Dances in Darkness

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK – Two recent dance events spoke more of doom and gloom than the earthly delights of cherry blossoms and daffodils that have accompanied the start of springtime in New York. In Jirí Kylián’s Last Touch First, viewed April 10 at the Joyce Theater, the Czech choreographer, known for his acclaimed []

Published: March 9, 2012
Category: review

Mark Morris Turns to Beethoven, Again

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — Mark Morris has turned to Beethoven for the fifth time with his “A Choral Fantasy,” which had its premiere last week at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. (I saw it March 2.) Danced to a (live) performance of the work of the same name, it is a playful, ironic []

Published: February 28, 2012
Category: review

Crystal Pite's Futuristic Choreography

By Rachel Straus

Seeing “The Matrix” in 1999 made my heart sink. It wasn’t Keanu Reeves’s acting that depressed me; it was the advances in live action animation. In the final battle scene, Reeves and Hugo Weaving engage in mortal combat. With millisecond timing, they evade each other’s rocket-force punches by bending their head to []