Rachel Straus - Dance Writer

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Juilliard Dance

 
Published: February 5, 2016
Category: review

At BAM: A Trisha Brown Masterwork, Perhaps for the Last Time

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK–In 1983 the Brooklyn Academy of Music launched the Next Wave Festival and commissioned the avant-garde choreographer Trisha Brown to make Set and Reset. Last week, the masterwork returned to BAM. With a score by Laurie Anderson titled Long Time No See (after its electronically sequenced lyrics), and sets by Robert []

Published: April 23, 2015
Category: review

Missing  Merce's  Ambiguity  

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK -­-­ The Stephen Petronio Company celebrated its 30th-­anniversary season April 7-­12 at the Joyce Theater. The Newark-­born choreographer’s most salient works draw as much from club and fashion culture as from concert dance, but as viewed on April 12, his program took a backward glance as well, with []

Published: June 20, 2012
Category: review

Dido & Aeneas, a "Choreographic Opera"

By Rachel Straus

BERLIN — The story of Dido & Aeneas has long been popular among contemporary choreographers. In 1989, Mark Morris created his Dido and Aeneas to Purcell’s late 17th-century opera. In 1999, Pina Bausch’s O Dido employed nothing of the opera score, but incorporated the myth’s water imagery. Choreographer Sasha Waltz []

Published: December 27, 2011
Category: profile

The End of Modern Dance?

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — Before Merce Cunningham died at age 90 in July 2009, he had decided that his company would die with him, preceded by a two-year world tour. And so, after the grand finale performances Dec. 29-31 at the Park Avenue Armory, the company will be snuffed out. Its demise carries []

Published: November 7, 2011
Category: review

The Sumptuous Gifts of Fall for Dance 2011

By Rachel Straus

NEW YORK — The Fall for Dance Festival is a two-week terpsichorean bonanza. It harkens back to vaudeville’s glory days, with its diverse array of talent and cheap seats. Now in its eighth year, the festival isn’t flagging (like the economy) or sputtering into dismal repetition (like certain unnamed politicians’ speeches). In []